Tag Archives: curry

Vegan “Butter Chicken” with Fried Tofu

3 Dec

20131203-002107.jpg

I realize that my blog has been rather meat-centric lately. Although I’ve had some vegetarian posts here and there,  it has been awhile since I’ve shared any vegan dishes.

I’m certain come January when I’ve had my fill of Christmas-y cheese puffs, sausage rolls and pâté that I will concentrate on super healthy, veggie-filled recipes again.  That’s the plan. 

So, this one is for you in mind, vegans. And for me, a little head start on 2014.

20131203-002122.jpg

To continue on with my Indian kick, I present you with…

Vegan “Butter Chicken” with Fried Tofu 

  • 1 fresh green chili (I used jalapeno)
  • 1 tomato, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh ginger
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 2 heaping tablespoons garam masala
  • 1 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder (or to taste)
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 large can crushed tomatoes
  • 1 can coconut milk (full fat is best)
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar (or to taste)
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil (for frying spices and tofu)
  • dash liquid smoke
  • 1 tablespoons dried fenugreek leaves
  • 1 package extra-firm tofu
  • Salt (to taste)
  1. Cut tofu into thick slices and press between paper towels to remove moisture for about 20 minutes, while preparing the sauce. Top with something heavy, like a cookbook.
  2. Meanwhile, in a pan at medium-high heat melt coconut oil and add 1 tablespoon garam masala. When it begins to puff and bubble, add garlic, ginger, chopped green chili and tomato.  Cook for 5 minutes.
  3. Add remaining spices and cook another few minutes until well mixed and fragrant.
  4. Stir in tomato paste, and then tomato puree. Bring to boil and reduce heat to a simmer. Add coconut milk, sugar and liquid smoke.
  5. Using a hand blender, blend sauce so that it is creamy and smooth, and all the spices are incorporated. Simmer until liquid has reduced about 1/4 (25 minutes or so). Add fenugreek leaves.
  6. Meanwhile, in separate pan, fry tofu slices in hot oil with salt until browned and a bit crispy.
  7. Remove from oil and chop into smaller bite sized pieces. Add to sauce.
  8. Serve curry with basmati or naan, top with fresh cilantro or more dried fenugreek leaves.
  9. Enjoy!

As for you meat eaters, fear not. This recipe is a real spicy, rich, hearty winner!

The sauce makes a great base, that would be good with almost anything; chicken (duh), chickpeas, tempeh or even pineapple. This recipe is pretty quick and easy as far as curries go. It smells amazing while it’s cooking and makes a pretty decent yield.

On a side note, in terms of views, November has high and above exceeded October (my previous best)  on Food, Mostly. It is super exciting to see the blog growing, slowly and steadily. I really appreciate all the sharing and comments from you guys. I love the engagement (that’s the whole point!), so if you like what you read, I encourage you to keep writing and sharing. It makes my day!

A sincerest,  “Thank You”

Maddie

Kensington Market, Carlo’s House of Spice, and my Curried Carrot Coconut Soup

27 Oct

Oh, Toronto.

You aren’t so pretty, all street car tracks and telephone wires, parked cars and concrete.

Noisy and sprawling with expensive taxis, glacial transit and grubby pigeons.

But you’ve got character. For all the shopping malls and chain stores, there is plenty of independent and creative spirit alive and thriving in Toronto

toronto

Perhaps nowhere more so than Kensington Market

20131027-215632.jpg

20131027-220308.jpg

One of my favourite things to do is spend the afternoon poking around, grabbing coffee and eating lunch with someone lovely tucked away somewhere in this neighbourhood.

One of my favourite shops is Carlo’s House of Spice. Because I’m a huge fan of spices! Did you know?

He’s got everything, including personal blends.

20131027-215737.jpg

20131027-215815.jpg

This place is my Mecca.

20131027-215829.jpg

20131027-215840.jpg

I like to go and buy obscure spices I have yet to experiment with. This trip I procured sumac powder, amchur powder (mango powder), curry leaves and fenugreek.

20131027-215907.jpg

20131027-215853.jpg

20131027-215713.jpg

For vintage shopping

20131027-215700.jpg

People watching

20131027-215921.jpg

And the obscure,

20131027-215934.jpg

20131027-215946.jpg

Kensington Market always puts me in a good mood.

The last last time I visited Carlo’s, I bought his custom hot madras curry powder. I’ve twice made this curried carrot coconut soup, which was so delicious, healthy and simple, my fave combo.

Great for an appetizer, lunch, or in instances requiring immediate night-vision.

20131027-215551.jpgCurried Carrot and Coconut Soup 

  • 1 big bag/bunch of organic carrots (2 lbs?)
  • 2 medium sized onions
  • 2 tablespoons curry powder (of your choice)
  • 1 can coconut milk (full fat for maximum richness)
  • Appox 4 cups vegetable or chicken stock. Water will do too, in a pinch.
  • salt n’ pepa
  1. Roughly chop carrots, and add to boiling water, peels on. Boil until soft
  2. In the meantime, thinly slice onions and fry in coconut oil until soft translucent over high heat.
  3. Add curry powder and mix. Add 1 tablespoon more oil so spices do not burn. Cook for 2 minutes.
  4. Drain carrots of water and add stock to the pot. Add onion and spice mixture and coconut milk.
  5. Blend with hand held blender until smooth.
  6. Season with salt and pepper.
  7. Let simmer for about an hour

20131027-215622.jpg

This soup was even better he next day, as most soups are. It was hearty, spicy, satisfying, and healthy too!

I can’t wait to experiment more with my growing spice collection, and share it with y’all!

Oh, and if you’re ever in the Market, make sure to check out Carlo’s.

Fun Facts:

Carrots: protect against Cardiovascular Disease, are high in antioxidants and Vitamin A, and are extremely low in calories.

Coconut milk: although high in fat, it is “good” fat, which makes you feel fuller, longer. It is also packed with vitamins C, E, B1, B3, B5, and B6 as well as iron, selenium, sodium, calcium, magnesium and phosphorus. It is an anti-viral, coconut milk contains a fatty acid called lauric acid, which is quite valuable to the human body. When it enters the body, lauric acid is converted to monolaurin, which is a compound that has antiviral and antibacterial properties.

Onions: the phytochemicals in onions improve the working of Vitamin C in the body, thus gifting you with improved immunity. They also contain chromium, which assists in regulating blood sugar.

What are your favourite new spices to cook with?

 

Creamy Coconut Curry with Tempeh and Lentils

16 Oct

As soon as I came home tonight, I knew it would be one of those dinners. You know. The whipped together ones. The ones you can’t believe actually turned out to be tasty, based on the sheer lack of provisions at hand.

That and the fact that for days I’ve been eating rice for breakfast, because we don’t even have eggs, bread or cereal.

Upon raiding the pantry, I did discover some lentils and coconut milk (and spices, naturally).

This curry was awesome! Sometimes I enjoy the challenge of being my own imaginary iron chef.

Image

This was very healthy too, served on quinoa with a side of salted cucumber. Remember this post touting the benefits of tempeh? It is like tofu’s cool older brother. And miraculously my cilantro was still fresh because of this method!

Image

Ingredients:

  • 1 medium onion
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 3 tablespoons sunflower oil (I’m even out of coconut!)
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 2.5 teaspoons cumin
  • 1 medium green chili (I used 1 fresh jalapeno) , seeded and chopped
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon tumeric
  • 1 kaffir lime leaf
  • 1 teaspoon fenugreek seeds
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne
  • 1 can coconut milk
  • 1 can lentils
  • 2/3rd of a package basil tempeh
  • fresh cilantro
  • salt and pepper
  • squeeze of fresh lime juice.
  1. Fry up onions in oil until browned, and then add garlic and ginger.
  2. Add spices and toast over medium heat- cumin, fenugreek, turmeric , garam masala, salt, pepper, cayenne until fragrant (about 1 minute).
  3. Add tomato paste, chopped chili and brown sugar, cook another few minutes.
  4. Add coconut milk. Puree mixture with hand held blender until smooth.
  5. Add lentils, kaffir leaf  and tempeh ( I use Henry’s Gourmet Organic Tempeh with Basil)
  6. Let simmer for 20 minutes (or longer) to allow flavours to blend. Finish with fresh cilantro and lime juice.

Obviously, if I had more veggies, I would have added them. And perhaps some cashews. However, this sauce makes a great versatile base for whatever ingredients you happen to have in the fridge.

On a separate note, this post is a bit of a milestone for me, its my 30th! (Post, that is!) Hurrah!

When things get busy , it can be sometimes difficult to cook, take photos and post. And sometimes, even with the best intentions,  I’ve made some flops, like this one: Image

Looked lovely, but sadly this salmon masala’s fish flavour was too overpowering for the delicate sauce. Sometimes recipes need a few tries to get right. But I aim to post more often in the future!

My New Year’s resolution in Jaunary, 2012 was to start a food blog. I knew I loved to cook, but nothing about blogging. I’ve learned a lot, and I’ve really enjoyed the process.

So, sincerely, from me to you, thanks for following Food, Mostly!

Sweet Potato Kofta with Cashew Coconut Curry

17 Apr

Image

I’m so sorry for abandoning the blog. The last few weeks have been an time of intense non-procrastination. Are you proud of me? Which is really a positive space to inhabit and every university student should aspire to. Thus, I have stayed far away from the blog. Too far. Although not much cooking has occurred, some has. There were even a couple of great dishes and photos taken, including some lovely tuna cakes and hearty gallo pinto bean burgers inspired by our trip to Nicaragua last summer.  But, alas, these posts were not meant to be.  I put off writing them for so long that I no-word-of-a-lie forgot the recipes. SO in honour of my hellish statistics exam now completed I’ve made these delectable treats to make up for lost time!

This is my take on Indian kofta, usually a vegetarian dish made of potato, vegetables or cashews and paneer. I decided to use sweet potato because I like them. I decided to use feta because I didn’t have any paneer, and Scott and I both randomly brought feta home yesterday (must.use.feta). They are quite healthy and easy to make!

Sweet Potato Kofta 

  • 2 cups cooked sweet potato
  • 1/2 red bell pepper finely diced
  • 1/2 cup crumbled feta
  • 1/2 cup flour ( I used rice flour)
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 2 tablespoons plain yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon Garam Masala
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil
  1. Mix cooked sweet potato (skin on) with flour, red pepper, cilantro, yogurt, garam masala, ginger, feta and salt in large bowl.
  2. Form into small round balls.
  3. Cook in coconut oil at medium high heat until crisp and browned on all sides (about 2 minutes each side)

Image

Cute, huh? These would be great on top of mixed greens, or served as appetizers with tamarind chutney. But really, they were fabulous topped with a rich curry.And, not to “toot my own horn” or anything, but this curry is the best I’ve ever made (and I’ve made lots). I couldn’t get enough! It was inspired by one of my favourite cookbooks, Everyday Indian, but I put my own spin on it with the cashew and coconut instead of the (lighter) yogurt version (also awesome, but less creamy).

Cashew Coconut Curry 

  • 2 large onions
  • 4 medium sized cloves of garlic
  • 2 tablespoons of fresh grated ginger
  • 2 tablespoons of tomato paste
  • 1 tablespoon of cumin
  • 1 tablespoon of Garam Masala
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1/2 tsp spicy cayenne
  • 1 tsp tumeric
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/4 cup plain yogurt
  • 1 cup cashews
  • 2 cups coconut milk
  • fresh cilantro to garnish
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 1/2 cup of water
  1. Sautee onions in coconut oil until browned over medium-high heat, long enough to be almost caramelized (about 15-20 minutes. This is a key step for enhanced flavour!). Once browned, add garlic and ginger and cook 2 minutes. Then add tomato paste and cumin and cook for 30 seconds.
  2. Reduce heat and add Garam Masala, honey (or sugar), cayenne, tumeric and salt. Cook 2 minutes.
  3. Add yogurt, water and 1 1/2 cups coconut milk, then blend well with hand held blender until smooth.
  4. Separately, puree cashews with remaining 1/2 cup coconut milk until smooth. Add to curry mixture.
  5. Simmer over low heat until ready to serve!

I served the kofta and curry over these corn crepes (almost like a dosa) with a green salad dressed in sesame vinaigrette.

Two notables- the next time I make kofta, I’m going to add chopped cashews. The sweet potato was rather soft and it would be nice to add more crunch. The bell peppers added to that, but even more crunch with the creamy-ness of the curry would be spot on. Secondly, the plain yogurt added a nice dimension that cut the richness of the curry a touch. In my opinion, it was an essential ingredient to the success of the dish. If there is no yogurt available, I would add a squeeze of lemon at the end for brightness.

Whew. Yummy.

Hopefully there will not be such a stretch until my next post! I’m looking forward to summer holidays (!) starting next week (!!). Scott and I are headed to Europe next month, so Food, Mostly may soon be reporting from abroad!

Image

Excitement!

Immy May

UK Lifestyle Blog

The Illusive Femme

inside my colourful mind

Crafty little Coco

DIY, Gluten-free Recipes and Life on Oahu

the vegan delicious

Vegan Recipes + Real Food

Maryseeo

Food|Beauty|Health|Travel|Everyday Adventures

Curated Style

Toronto life in style and fashion

eatprayjade.wordpress.com/

eating and traveling in pursuit of la dolce vita

%d bloggers like this: